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  • Advanced changed the description of the group Group logo of How to Choose Between Thermosets or ThermoplasticsHow to Choose Between Thermosets or Thermoplastics from “There are two main groups of plastics available for manufacturing: thermosets and thermoplastics. While you probably can’t tell the difference by looking at them, their chemical structure and bonds are what leads to marked differences in their physical properties. At our <a href="https://advancedplastiform.com/injection-molding/">injection molding company</a>, we only use thermoplastics to manufacture parts and products, but in order to understand why we use the plastics we do, it’s important to know how they differ and the benefits of both.

    <a></a>How Do Thermosets and Thermoplastics Differ?

    The root of both words begins with “therm” meaning “heat” or “warm,” so right there, you know that they are classified by how they react to heat.

    <a></a>Thermoplastics

    Thermoplastics soften and even become liquid when exposed to heat, making it possible to form and mold them into specific shapes and designs. Even as their form changes from a rigid solid to a softer, more malleable material, to a liquid, the chemical bonds don’t change. This means that after it cools, it can be reheated and shaped again if needed, and also recycled.

    Thermoplastic is similar to water in this way. When water is boiled, the steam is a gas, or when it’s frozen, it becomes a solid, but it’s still water, chemically.

    <a></a>Thermosets

    Thermosets are melted to be shaped, but during the cooling and curing process, the polymers cross-link which forms an unbreakable chemical bond, creating a new material than before. Thermosets can’t be reverted back to their original form because heating and cooling once changes the chemical structure completely, so heating it just burns it. While thermoplastics are like water, thermosets are like cookie dough – once it’s cookies, it can never go back to being dough.

    <a></a>Types of Thermoset and Thermoplastic Materials

    Thermoplastics and thermosets are both widely used in everyday items and as parts or components in countless products. For injection molding, we often use, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) to make medical supplies, vehicle knobs and dials, and refrigeration components.

    Examples of thermosets include polyester, melamine, silicone, epoxy, or urea formaldehyde. Many plastic dinner plates are made from melamine whereas the polyurethane and epoxy coatings used on concrete or garage floors are made from epoxy and urea formaldehyde.

    <a></a>Thermoplastics or Thermosets: Which is Right for You?

    Injection molding can only be performed with thermoplastics, but that doesn’t mean thermosets don’t have a place. In fact, both plastics have key benefits depending on the properties you want your final product to have.

    <a></a>Benefits of Thermoplastics

    ● Can be recycled

    ● Pliable, but can withstand impact, chemical exposure, and UV rays, and water

    ● Many varieties are food-safe

    ● Customizable for functionality and aesthetics

    ● Able to be reshaped or molded

    <a></a>Benefits of Thermoset Materials

    ● Very hard and rigid, but can be brittle

    ● Highly strength-to-weight ratio

    ● Corrosion resistant

    ● High melting or burning point

    ● Can be made more stable and durable with fiberglass and Kevlar. .

    <a></a>Learn More About Thermoplastics from Our Injection Molding Company

    At Advanced Plastiform, Inc., we work with a variety of industries across the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic, designing and manufacturing custom plastics through injection molding and thermoforming. If you’d like to learn more about what kind of plastics are right for you, we recommend speaking with an injection molding company today.” to “There are two main groups of plastics available for manufacturing: thermosets and thermoplastics. While you probably can’t tell the difference by looking at them, their chemical structure and bonds are what leads to marked differences in their physical properties. At our <a href="https://advancedplastiform.com/injection-molding/">injection molding company</a>, we only use thermoplastics to manufacture parts and products, but in order to understand why we use the plastics we do, it’s important to know how they differ and the benefits of both.

    <a></a>How Do Thermosets and Thermoplastics Differ?

    The root of both words begins with “therm” meaning “heat” or “warm,” so right there, you know that they are classified by how they react to heat.

    <a></a>Thermoplastics

    Thermoplastics soften and even become liquid when exposed to heat, making it possible to form and mold them into specific shapes and designs. Even as their form changes from a rigid solid to a softer, more malleable material, to a liquid, the chemical bonds don’t change. This means that after it cools, it can be reheated and shaped again if needed, and also recycled.

    Thermoplastic is similar to water in this way. When water is boiled, the steam is a gas, or when it’s frozen, it becomes a solid, but it’s still water, chemically.

    <a></a>Thermosets

    Thermosets are melted to be shaped, but during the cooling and curing process, the polymers cross-link which forms an unbreakable chemical bond, creating a new material than before. Thermosets can’t be reverted back to their original form because heating and cooling once changes the chemical structure completely, so heating it just burns it. While thermoplastics are like water, thermosets are like cookie dough – once it’s cookies, it can never go back to being dough.

    <a></a>Types of Thermoset and Thermoplastic Materials

    Thermoplastics and thermosets are both widely used in everyday items and as parts or components in countless products. For injection molding, we often use, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) to make medical supplies, vehicle knobs and dials, and refrigeration components.

    Examples of thermosets include polyester, melamine, silicone, epoxy, or urea formaldehyde. Many plastic dinner plates are made from melamine whereas the polyurethane and epoxy coatings used on concrete or garage floors are made from epoxy and urea formaldehyde.

    <a></a>Thermoplastics or Thermosets: Which is Right for You?

    Injection molding can only be performed with thermoplastics, but that doesn’t mean thermosets don’t have a place. In fact, both plastics have key benefits depending on the properties you want your final product to have.

    <a></a>Benefits of Thermoplastics

    ● Can be recycled

    ● Pliable, but can withstand impact, chemical exposure, and UV rays, and water

    ● Many varieties are food-safe

    ● Customizable for functionality and aesthetics

    ● Able to be reshaped or molded

    <a></a>Benefits of Thermoset Materials

    ● Very hard and rigid, but can be brittle

    ● Highly strength-to-weight ratio

    ● Corrosion resistant

    ● High melting or burning point

    ● Can be made more stable and durable with fiberglass and Kevlar. .

    <a></a>Learn More About Thermoplastics from Our Injection Molding Company

    At Advanced Plastiform, Inc., we work with a variety of industries across the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic, designing and manufacturing custom plastics through injection molding and thermoforming. If you’d like to learn more about what kind of plastics are right for you, we recommend speaking with an injection molding company today.

    Original Reference: https://bit.ly/362IrHg1 week, 6 days ago

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